From east to west, they march

As an estimated 700,000 people converged in Washington D.C. for the Jan. 20 Presidential Inauguration, millions of  people marched worldwide for a host of issues that are swelling under the new regime: women’s rights, civil rights, healthcare, LGBTQ rights, and environmental concerns, among others. Anti-Trump demonstrations began on Inauguration Day, carrying into the weekend and beyond. Women’s Marches took place across the world Jan. 21 and drew a combined total of more than 3 million people, the largest coordinated protest in U.S. history.

Mass demonstration was paired with resistance from government officials, such as the dozens of Democratic lawmakers who said they would boycott the inauguration, including Wisconsin’s Rep. Mark Pocan, D-Madison, and the resignation of the State Department’s entire senior administrative team.

These demonstrations were documented and submitted by participants across the country. Click through the photo essays below to get a glimpse of marches that took place in Milwaukee, St. Paul, Denver, Madison, Austin, Chicago, and Manhattan:


Editor’s note: While we cannot capture everything that has taken place, we would like to include as many voices, perspectives, and experience as possible. We acknowledge that while many found the marches to be an empowering display of unity, some disapproved, and others felt conflicted for a variety of reasons. We would like to share those opinions. If you have photos or reflections you would like to contribute, please send them to alisonh@rustmil.com and andreat@rustmil.com and we will be sure to include them.



Milwaukee:
Milwaukee events included a Femme Solidarity March, taking place during the weekend-long Riverwest FemFest; an Inauguration Day Protest hosted by the Milwaukee Coalition Against Trump; and an appearance from an Overpass Light Brigade lighting an I-43 bridge with the message, “Trumpocalypse.”

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St. Paul:
In St. Paul, Minn., more than 100,000 people marched on the capital to voice their opinions. Photos submitted by Jessica Tabbutt.

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Denver: 
The Women’s March on Denver drew somewhere between 100,000 and 200,000 people to the Civic Center in downtown. Check out some of the photos by Rust Magazine’s managing editor, Andrea Tritschler.

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Madison:
The Women’s March on Madison had a reported 100,000 people in the state capitol. Alice Waraxa, Rust Magazine’s visual director, documented the feeling of the movement and some of the creative signage.

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Austin:
In Austin, the Women’s March drew a crowd of up to 50,000 and Garrick Jannene was there to capture the event. Here are his photos.

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Chicago:
The Women’s March in Chicago had an estimated total of 250,000 people. The turnout was significantly larger than organizers anticipated. According to Jill Huennekens, the crowd was encouraged not to march due to safety concerns, but many broke through the barricades and marched through downtown Chicago and to Trump Tower. Here are some photos from the event taken by Jennifer Taylor and Jill Huennekens.

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New York City:
Women’s Marches and Anti-Trump demonstrations have filled New York City streets and burrows. Demonstrations grew in the days following weekend inauguration events, as executive orders rolled out. Some are being led by musicians and actors, such as Jane Fonda, Jaden Smith, and Shai LeBouf – who was arrested at a “He Will Not Divide Us” protest in Queens Thursday morning. In addition, thousands of demonstrators gathered near Washington Square Park Jan. 25 “to protest an anticipated executive order from Trump aimed at indefinitely banning Syrian refugee admissions; temporarily banning entry of people from certain majority-Muslim countries; and suspending visas to countries of ‘particular concern,'” according to the Huffington Post. 

Below are photos from Nicole Potosme, who captured some of the action in Manhattan. 

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